Local residents were welcome at a variety of venues situated across the city, making Sept. 30 a perfect day to play tourist in their own backyard. “It’s like visiting your own city for vacation, for one day a year!” said Alan Lok, Doors Open Committee member.

This year also celebrates Canada’s 150th with historical sites accessible to everyone free of charge, including the Heintzman House that was built in 1861. Thornhill Village library is another location that was on display not just for it’s history but its legend.

The library was originally a residence that hosted a Book Society in 1829 and eventually built into a library in 1851 for Ellen Ramsden who is thought to inhabit the location to this day. The most significant physical remnant of hers is an old wooden rocking chair that remains there and has been the subject of many ghostly sightings by patrons.

Other occurrences documented by the library in a note called Recent Experiences with the Ghost include books sticking out of shelves, flying off the shelves, and reappearing out of nowhere. The historic library has been extended to include a children’s section and computer lab.

For a full list of sites, visit: www.markham.ca

Photo: A view of the many doorways and entrances inside Thornhill Village Library.